photo: Mathew Bennett@Unsplash

This week there has been a sense of Goldie really taking shape. We have copy flowing backwards and forwards from our trusty team of sub-editors, images being analysed for best fit and page layouts under scrutiny from Editors who think they know better than designers! Much like any team we are learning to compromise in order to create harmony.

And we are all trying to produce a magazine that feels authentic, with a viewpoint that isn’t available elsewhere. And that is hard to define. What is different about Goldie…what do we stand for and why will people want to shell out £8.00 to take a copy home?

I have been wondering what common thread is woven through the content for our first edition and it seems that we are asking our readers to suspend the limitations that mainstream media likes to impose on the over 40s. When I talk to friends, some have a sense of being resigned to having lived the best years of their life already, there is a feeling of nostalgia for what they have achieved, an idea that they can’t start something new because…well because of what? What is stopping you from being and doing anything that you fancy? I’m not advocating ‘self-interested ego driven all about me’ lifestyles, but most people’s ambitions are relatively benign; I would like to learn to play the piano…oh you can’t do that I’m told, you needed to learn music when you were younger you won’t be any good…so I allow others opinions to thwart my plans. What I’d really like to hear is “WOW go for it …I read about a sixty-year-old woman who had never had access to an instrument but can now play nursery rhymes for her grandchildren.”

photo: Lukas Budimaier@Unsplash

I feel that waking up every day is an opportunity, I want to be encouraged to try out things I haven’t encountered before – publishing a magazine – to wear a new version of me – if the hat fits – to feel that there is still time to be the best version of me. I don’t want to be told: “you can’t do that at your age.”

In issue 1 of Goldie we have brilliant examples of people who are sharing a go-getting approach to ageing; people who have discovered that buying a bike allowed them to tackle a weighty issue in their life, that there is never the wrong time to publish a book, that taking up photography changes the way you view the world, that you can be an activist at 80, or discover you love cooking when you have spent your whole life as an accountant.

We have a mix of life-affirming stories which we hope will encourage our readers to see that life is for living, that every day is a fresh start; that you can’t change the outside world but you can sure as hell make choices which enable you to hold your head high and feel good about life right now.

If we had listened to naysayers who told us that print is dead, no one wants to see ‘old’ people having a life, or informing us that certain other magazines will protest at our title, we wouldn’t be having the great time we are researching ideas and stories, chatting to all and sundry, and discovering that we have a talent for convincing people to stock a new magazine with no track record. We wouldn’t be making new friends from far and wide, learning printer-speak or thinking about the divergent aspects of global wisdom. Oh yes, we have grandiose thoughts when we wake up at 3 am, it is not all worrying about shelf-positioning in Selfridges.

photo: Ebrhard Grossgasteiger @Unspalsh

When someone says to me that at my age I shouldn’t be taking risks I can’t help but wonder what hidden ambitions they have, what regrets they will carry over into their futures and why they feel the need to play safe.

I am lucky; I’ve experienced big fuck-ups in my life so failure holds no fear. I am incredibly lucky to be part of a team where we all share a vision that life can be good at any age, and that together we can move mountains. Or at least get on our proverbial bikes and climb them.

There is still time…time to make a difference to your own life, the life of those you love and time to change the world… ambition doesn’t stop with age… so what is stopping you?

Rebecca x x

And while you are challenging the stereotypes of ageing please bear in mind that we need articles for Issue 2. Send your pitches to:

Jeanie@nolimitsmagazine.co.uk or Rebecca@nolimitsmagazine.co.uk

Categories: Newsletter

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